Wednesday, August 03, 2005

Wednesday morning keynote

The Wednesday morning keynote is as usual hosted by Nat Torkington in his traditional blindingly bright shirt.


Nat Torkington kicking things off...

The first speaker was Marc Hedlund who launched O'Reilly's & SpikeSource's CodeZoo for Python and Ruby. What, no Perl. Oh, no, wait, we already have CPAN...


Nat Torkington and Tim O'Reilly

He then handed over to Tim O'Reilly himself for the O'Reilly Radar who immediately promised us he wasn't going to give the same Open Source Paradigm Shift talk as the year before. He then ran through a a few things that he thinks will be interesting, of which his top hit was Ruby on Rails
Ruby on Rails may by the Perl of Web 2.0...
He went on to talk about Greasemonkey and Findory, which attempts to do something along the lines of Amazon Recommendations. If you like this blog entry, you'll probably like this other one...

Tim claims that the thing that is cropping up around the computer industry at the moment is that users add value, and he seems to feel that this is a driving theme of Web 2.0. Next on the radar was open source telephony and,
If you're not thinking about internet telephony, you should be...
along with the transformation of radio and television. The interesting thing here is that, according to Yahoo! Research, the number two PVR behind Tivo is homebrew. Not what I'd expected...

After briefly mentioning Make: Magazine which O'Reilly launched at last years OSCON, Tim went on to talk about the computing book market.

He then handed over to Kim Polese, the CEO of SpikeSource, who talked about how companies are building things onto of the open source phenomenon and the long tail. There didn't seem to be much here that people inviolved in the open source of community wouldn't have heard before, she talked a lot about people become their own vendors and how there is a new generation of software companies emerging which are sitting between the software and the more traditional companies.


Kim Polese saying things we're heard before...

Apparently SpikeSource is all about solving the problem of velocity mismatch and testing, the ugly stepchild of software, and how to scale testing frameworks and automation of dependency testing. Definately an odd choice for an OSCON keynote...

Following Kim was Andrew Morton of OSDL, who talked about the commodisation of open source software and the comapnies are embbedding their own developers into the development teams of the software they have come to rely on,
Haven't seen much from Sun lately, but that might change when they finally give up on Solaris...
He also talked about Linux on the desktop, altough I'm not really sure why because its becoming increasingly irrelevant these days. Surely that's the entire point of Web 2.0, that the operating system running on someones desktop isn't particularly important any more. Disappointgly this presumably means that OSDL is still fighting the last battle, along with Microsoft and Sun. That's okay I guess, the rest of us can get on with building the future...

The next speaker was Jeremy Zawodny from Yahoo! who talked about why Open Source is a good thing, I'm confused, again surely we all agree about that? He did mention Yahoo's recent acquisitions of Flickr and Konfabulator which I thought was, well, interesting...

As an aside it looks like just as predicted yesterday the wireless network has collapsed under the weight of the assembled masses, there are apparently over two thousand people at this conference. Unfortunately it also took my PowerBook with it as all the networked applications I was running hung solidly, go figure. So I've had to return to basics, this post coming to you curtsey of vi...


Nat Torkington talking to Jonathon Schwartz

The morning keynote closed with Nat Torkington interviewing one of the most prolific commentors on open source Jonathon Schwartz about, amongst other things, the Apache open source Java project. Which, despite Jonathon's comments, I'm sure Sun is very upset about...

Update: Brad was also blogging the keynote speeches.